Locations

Ferrets

The AVMA recognizes that ferrets are being kept as pets and for research purposes. In those states or areas where ferret ownership is legal, the AVMA recommends responsible ferret ownership. This includes knowledge pertaining to ferret husbandry (care, nutrition, housing, and the species' habits). It is also recommended that no ferret be left unattended with any individual incapable of removing himself or herself from the ferret. It is also important that your ferret have proper care by a veterinarian legally authorized to practice veterinary medicine. This includes preventive medicine and medical or surgical care.

If You Choose A Pet Ferret

The average life span of a ferret is 8 to 10 years. When fully grown, females weigh about one and a half to two pounds while males are generally about twice the weight of females. A female's length is about twelve inches nose to tail and the males are about sixteen inches. Ferrets come in many color variations. Most are shades of brown, grey and black with the mask, feet and tails generally being the darkest in color. "Albino" ferrets are white with pink eyes.

Please read on to understand more if a ferret is the right pet for you.

  • Food and Housing

    Food Ferrets are exceptionally playful, so expect your ferret to tip over his food and water bowls. Check on them often, tape them down, or use an unspillable bowl. Rodent water bottles are not recommended as a ferret may damage his teeth on the spout. Because ferrets have such rapid metabolism, they

    Read more
  • Ferret Health

    Once your ferret has been fixed and de-scented, a monthly bath is all your ferret will require. Use a good quality ferret, cat, or "no-tears" human shampoo, preferably with a conditioner. Yearly Veterinary Visit You will need to take your ferret in to your veterinarian twice a year for a medical checkup

    Read more
  • Behavior and Training

    Behavior Ferrets have powerful, distinct and engaging personalities, and a playful and fastidious nature. Ferrets are diurnal creatures with their periods of greatest activity just before sunrise and shortly after sunset. They sleep about eighteen to twenty hours of the day, waking up twice a day for

    Read more

NEW PATIENTS RECEIVE 15% OFF FIRST VISIT

  • Vertigo or Old Dog Vestibular Syndrome

    Image of an old dog laying on the ground. Vertigo is a syndrome in the elderly dog, which can be very frightening to the owners. The dog is suddenly afflicted with a balance problem, usually staggering, but occasionally unable to stand, and more rarely actually rolling over and over. There is a tilting ...

    Read More
  • Ticks

    Image of ticks. Ticks are the small wingless external parasites, living by hematophagy on the blood of mammals, birds, and occasionally reptiles and amphibians. Ticks are blood-sucking parasites that are often found in freshly mown grass, where they will rest themselves at the tip of a blade so as to ...

    Read More
  • Seizures

    Image of dog laying down on the floor. Seizures are common in dogs, but more unusual in cats. Seizures are just symptoms which can occur with many kinds of diseases. They can happen because of diseases outside the brain or inside the brain. Low blood sugar that can happen with an overdose of insulin ...

    Read More
  • Salmonella

    Image of salmonella. Salmonella is a bacterium that can cause disease in humans, dogs, cats, and other animals. It can cause a variety of symptoms, commonly vomiting and/or diarrhea, but also severe infections and septicemia. It can also cause abscesses, meningitis, bone infections, and abortion. Salmonella ...

    Read More
  • Roundworms

    Image of roundworms There are many types of roundworms, but some of the most common are intestinal parasites of dogs, cats, and raccoons. Puppies are frequently born with roundworms, and kittens can be infected via the mother's milk or feces. Adult roundworms are ivory colored, four to six inches long, ...

    Read More
  • Rabies

    Image of stethoscope and a sign that says rabies. Rabies is a fatal viral infection that is transmitted primarily through bite wounds. Skunks, bats, raccoons, and foxes are the primary carriers. Rabies is also fatal to humans, there has been only one case of a person surviving rabies when treatment ...

    Read More
  • Parasites

    Close up image of parasites. There are many types of parasites that are found in the GI tract of cats and dogs. Worms such as roundworms, whipworms, and hookworms are very common in almost all parts of the world. These parasites shed their infective eggs in the pet's stool and contaminate the environment; ...

    Read More
  • Luxating Patella

    Image of dog with hind leg shaved. Luxating patella is a condition where the kneecap (patella) moves out of its normal position. Luxating patella is one of the most common knee joint abnormalities of dogs, but it is only occasionally seen in cats. It may affect one or both of the knees. In some cases ...

    Read More
  • Ruptured Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL)

    Image of dog jumping and catching a frisbee at the park. The rupture of the cruciate ligament is the most common knee injury in the dog. This injury has two common presentations. One is the young athletic dog playing roughly who acutely ruptures the ligament and is non-weight bearing on the affected ...

    Read More
  • Liver Shunt

    Image of dog laying down. A liver shunt is also named a PSS, portosystemic shunt, portacaval shunt or portosystemic vascular anomaly. This abnormality occurs when a pet's venous blood from the intestine bypasses the liver. In the normal pet, blood vessels pick up nutrients from ingested material in ...

    Read More